Lessons from gender and cash-based programming in Malawi

There has been a lack of analysis of the impact of cash transfers on power dynamics and gender-based violence in Malawi. This paper from Concern Worldwide seeks to fill that gap.   

Triphonia Jonathan, (30) receiving a cash transfer from Nuciana Njolomola, 45 an agent used by Concern Worldwide, Chazuka Village, Mchinji, Malawi Photo by Jennifer Nolan.
Triphonia Jonathan, (30) receiving a cash transfer from Nuciana Njolomola, 45 an agent used by Concern Worldwide, Chazuka Village, Mchinji, Malawi Photo by Jennifer Nolan.

This paper asserts that cash transfers can have a life-saving impact, supporting women and men’s basic needs for food and other necessities during a disaster situation, without necessarily increasing GBV. It goes on to argue, however, that programmes such as the long-term Graduation model, which integrate cash-based assistance into wider resilience-raising interventions, provide a means of promoting social norm change and attitude change in the long term when issues of gender equality are explored and addressed throughout the programme.

Download Resources

Download
Share your concern