Challenges in using the DBC approach to aid intervention design

Challenges in using the DBC approach to aid intervention design

05 February 2016

In 2012, Concern began employing the Designing for Behaviour Change (DBC) approach to aid intervention design. The ultimate aim was to bridge the knowledge-practice gap and to achieve sustainable change in important health behaviours. 

The DBC process helps in the development of a social and behaviour change programme strategy. Examples of behaviour change analysed for this study included handwashing in Mozambique and ante natal care (ANC) attendance in Afghanistan.

This poster was presented by Concern’s Global Health & HIV and AIDS Programme Adviser, Breda Gahan, at the SBCC in Addis Ababa on 8 February 2016. It provides an overview of the challenges that Concern’s teams encountered in using the DBC approach.

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Handwashing demonstration in Freetown, Sierra Leone in 2014. Photograph taken by: Michael Duff /Concern Worldwide

Challenges in using the DBC approach to aid intervention design

This poster, presented at the Summit on Social and Behavior Change Communication (SBCC) on 8 February 2016, outlines the challenges encountered by Concern in employing the Designing for Behaviour Change (DBC) approach to aid intervention design.