DR Congo: The impact of cash transfers and vouchers

DR Congo: The impact of cash transfers and vouchers

30 April 2013

Concern has partnered with UNICEF, Tufts University and the Centre for Global Development to assess the impact of cash transfers compared to vouchers in the Democratic Republic of Congo. These two reports show our findings. 

Here are some extracts from the reports, which can be downloaded by clicking on the links below:

From the Centre for Global Development's working paper:

In response to the devastating conflict, a number of international organizations have used cash and vouchers to assist internally displaced populations. While the value of the voucher was less than the household’s normal total food expenditures (infra-marginal), voucher households purchased more food items than they would have otherwise had they been provided with cash (extra-marginal). There was also no evidence that cash-transfer households were using their transfers for temptation goods.

From UNICEF's full report:

Overall, the results of the research suggest that cash transfer households were able to use the transfer to buy a more diverse set of food and non-food itemsthan  voucher households. More cash households bought cereals, meat, condiments, oil and vegetables, medicines and housing materials than their voucher counterparts. These patterns were largely similar in November (after the first two transfers) and March (after the last transfer), despite very different transfer amounts in both periods.

Download a copy of this resource

DR Congo: The impact of cash transfers and vouchers

Concern has partnered with UNICEF and the Centre for Global Development to assess the impact of cash transfers compared to vouchers in the Democratic Republic of Congo. These two reports show our findings.