Burundi

Why are we in Burundi? With high levels of poverty, malnutrition, and maternal mortality, Burundi is one of the poorest countries in the world. Concern Worldwide has been operational in Burundi since 1997 and currently implements programmes focusing on health, nutrition, livelihoods, and WASH.

*We are currently responding to the threat of COVID-19 in Burundi. Find out more about our response here.

Almost 80% of Burundians are living in poverty (51% in extreme poverty)

The maternal mortality rate in Burundi is amongst the worst in the world with 740 deaths per 100,000 live births, making it one of the most dangerous places in the world to have a child. Our work in Burundi focuses on nutrition, health, and livelihoods, with a particular emphasis on improving nutrition and overall health among people who are excluded from the health system. We specialise in community-based health and nutrition interventions.

Latest achievements

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COVID-19 messaging

A total of 29,078 households (Concern beneficiaries) were sensitised on COVID-19 during the month of April 2020. This is approximately 162,836 people.

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Cash transfers

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New project locations

Aline Nsabimana’s family shell and sort the dried beans they have just harvested. Chris de Bode/Concern Worldwide.
Aline Nsabimana’s family shell and sort the dried beans they have just harvested. Chris de Bode/Concern Worldwide.
Community Health Worker Jeannette Icimanishatse with one-year-old Nadia Niyihankuye Bukinanyana, Cibitoke, Burundi. Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Concern Worldwide.
Community Health Worker Jeannette Icimanishatse with one-year-old Nadia Niyihankuye Bukinanyana, Cibitoke, Burundi. Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Concern Worldwide.
Clotilde Ndayisenga (25) with her daughter Arlene Akimana (2) at their home in Rugombo, Cibitoke. Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Concern Worldwide.
Clotilde Ndayisenga (25) with her daughter Arlene Akimana (2) at their home in Rugombo, Cibitoke. Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Concern Worldwide.
Nurse Orene Nahimana measures three-month-old Roger Bimenyimana’s rate of breathing to diagnose if he has pneumonia. Photo: Concern Worldwide.
Nurse Orene Nahimana measures three-month-old Roger Bimenyimana’s rate of breathing to diagnose if he has pneumonia. Photo: Concern Worldwide.
Widow Isabelle Mundana (66) earns a living from selling white aubergines at market which she cultivates on her plot of land and kitchen garden, along with caja peas, Chinese cabbage, amaranth, onion and spinach. She has benefitted from nutrition and hygiene training and a series of money transfers as part of Concern’s community and household resilience programme to improve living conditions and livelihoods for the most vulnerable. Photo: Darren Vaughan/Concern Worldwide.
Isabelle has received training and cash transfers. Photo: Darren Vaughan / Concern Worldwide.

How we're helping in Burundi

We are working hard to combat extreme poverty and build resilience in Burundi through our livelihoods and health and nutrition programmes.

OpenHealth and nutrition
OpenSupporting livelihoods
OpenNational engagement

Help families to survive a COVID-19 hunger pandemic

  • An estimated one billion people around the world live in urban slums

  • Many are going hungry due to coronavirus restrictions

  • We need your help to support families through the unfolding hunger pandemic

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