Liberia

Why Liberia? Fourteen years of devastating civil war in Liberia ended in 2003, leaving infrastructure destroyed and the economy shattered.

Concern began its operations in Liberia in 1996, with a focus on nutrition, livelihood, gender equity, education, health, agriculture, and emergency response.

*We are currently responding to the threat of COVID-19 in Liberia. Find out more about our response here.

Needs and challenges in Liberia

The needs are enormous in Liberia, with much of the population living below the national poverty line.

Negative impacts of the civil crisis that ended in 2003 persist on many sectors of the country, presenting citizens with limited positive options to navigate challenges.

Liberia’s economy remains struggling with its poverty headcount ratio at $1.90 a day. The country largely depends on foreign aid.

Minimum attention to the agricultural sector leads to food insecurity, and poor nutritional practices at household level is a major factor hampering infant nutrition and growth.

In an effort to address some of these challenges, Concern Liberia continues to work with poor communities through the establishment of mother groups, community savings and loan associations, WASH committees, and Small Holders Farmers.

Latest achievements

One

Improved food and nutrition security

In Grand Bassa and Rivercess counties, 19 storage facilities have been constructed for fruits, vegetables, cassava and products (garie, fufu, etc.) and other staples in an effort to reduce food losses, boost processing and improve storage. The facilities have been strategically constructed close to markets and will store farmers' produce while awaiting sales day.

Two

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene

Three

COVID-19 response

Brothers Darry (9) and Sala (7) from Toe Town, Liberia. Pictured here in their school shirts. These brothers benefit from a new water pump constructed by Concern Worldwide. Photo: Gavin Douglas / Concern Worldwide.
Brothers Darry (9) and Sala (7) from Toe Town, Liberia. Photo: Gavin Douglas / Concern Worldwide.
Rebecca Dolley with her husband Jeremiah in Nakai Town. The couple have four children together. Photo: Gavin Douglas / Concern Worldwide.
Rebecca Dolley with her husband Jeremiah in Nakai Town. Photo: Gavin Douglas / Concern Worldwide.
Jacob David is village elder in Yarplah Town. Jacob's village resposibilities include; Counselling; Teaching and participating at board meetings. Photo: Gavin Douglas / Concern Worldwide.
Jacob David is village elder in Yarplah Town. Photo: Gavin Douglas / Concern Worldwide.
Soloman Tarr, sitting on the right alongside other members of the Gueh Town CSLA. Photo: Sam Holder / Concern Worldwide.
Soloman Tarr, sitting on the right alongside other members of the Gueh Town CSLA. Photo: Sam Holder / Concern Worldwide.
Sadah Smith of Toe Town. Sadah and her three daughters struggle to collect clean water from the local creek. Concern have installed a well in the centre of Toe Town so the families finally have access to clean water. Photo: Gavin Douglas / Concern Worldwide.
Sadah struggled to collect clean water from the local creek. Photo: Gavin Douglas / Concern Worldwide.

Working with partners

In May 2021, we signed a contract with partner organisations Sister Aid Liberia (SALI) and Community Empowerment for Change (CEC) under the Prosperous Agriculture Road Map to Nutrition & Entrepreneurship, Reinforcing Sustainability (PARTNERS) programme, funded by the European Union.

An integrated multi-sector programme, it is supporting almost 10,000 women, men and children in rural communities. Concern’s role in the consortium is to focus on nutrition.  We’re supporting 2,108 smallholder farmers to grow more crops, more effectively in order to increase their income.

With little to no provision of banking services in rural areas, we have set up 143 ‘Savings and Loans Associations’ for farmers and for communities, supporting 3,901 people to save more money and start small businesses. We have also set up parent groups for 1,816 parents to children under the age of five selected to support them with strategies for tackling malnutrition.

SALI is a women-led NGO that promotes research, policy development, leadership and capacity building for women. They will work with 500 women in rural communities under this programme, helping to improve their involvement in financial decision making, reduce levels of Gender Based Violence, and establish a business training centre.

CEC seeks to provide empowerment platforms that support and strengthen the contribution of local populations to development opportunities.  Their work will focus on women’s economic empowerment as well as helping to link local community savings and loan associations into wider networks with improved linkages to banks and financial institutions, in order to secure loans for larger businesses in rural areas.

Sister Aid Liberia
Concern partner, Sister Aid Liberia, campaigning against Gender based Violence. Photo: SALI
Community Empowerment for Change, Liberia
Concern partner, Community Empowerment for Change, conducting a community training session. Photo: CEC

How we’re helping Liberia

We work with the poorest people to fight chronic poverty and establish sustainable resilience in our program communities using local approaches. Our thematic areas are gender equity, health, livelihood and education.

Health
Agriculture and rural livelihoods
Gender
African child holding onto older sister

Horn of Africa Emergency Appeal

  • Millions of people ib the brink of starvation

  • Estimated that a person is dying of hunger every 48 seconds across Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia

  • 5.7 million children are facing starvation

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