Malawi

Why are we in Malawi? Malawi is ranked 172 out of 189 in the Human Development Index. More than 71% of Malawians are living below the poverty line, of which an estimated 20% are living in extreme poverty. We work with the most vulnerable households in Malawi, supporting livelihoods, resilience to climate change, and promoting gender equality.

*We are currently responding to the threat of COVID-19 in Malawi. Find out more about our response here.

Over 80% of Malawians source their livelihoods from the land

Climatic shocks such as drought, flooding, and strong weather patterns are a regular occurrence in Malawi. In March 2019, Cyclone Idai hit the country, directly affecting almost one million people, and killing 60. The country was already suffering from high rates of chronic malnutrition, with a stunting rate of 37.1% among children under five years old. Malawi’s population has grown by 35% over the past ten years to 17.1 million, placing huge stress on land and crop production Gender inequality is a major challenge still, with Malawi ranking 145 out of 159 countries on the Gender Inequality Index.

Latest achievements

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Emergency response

With the support of Irish Aid, we launched one of the first COVID-19 response programmes in a highly dense suburb of Lilongwe, which reached over 36,000 people through critical WASH supplies and sensitisation on COVID-19 prevention measures and protection issues. We also trained over 100 key health workers on prevention practices while ensuring they are equipped with PPE.

 

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Graduation programme

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Food and nutrition

Marita Kafera waters her kitchen garden, Malawi. Photo: Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.
Marita Kafera waters her kitchen garden, Malawi. Photo: Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.
Joseph Kanyangalazi with one of his pigs, Malawi. Photo: Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.
Joseph Kanyangalazi with one of his pigs, Malawi. Photo: Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.
Workers load up trucks with supplies for the areas of the Nsanje Region worst affected by Cyclone Idai.  Photo: Gavin Douglas / Concern Worldwide.
Supplies being loaded for the areas of the Nsanje Region worst affected by Cyclone Idai. Photo: Gavin Douglas / Concern Worldwide.
Belita Andrade brings her emergency supplies home after Cyclone Idai hit Malawi. Photo: Gavin Douglas / Concern Worldwide.
Belita Andrade brings her emergency supplies home after Cyclone Idai hit Malawi. Photo: Gavin Douglas / Concern Worldwide.
Children laughing and playing in Malawi. Photo Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.
Children laughing and playing in Malawi. Photo Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.
Winnie Banda holds sweet potatoes, Malawi. Photo: Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.
Winnie Banda holds sweet potatoes, Malawi. Photo: Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.
Sisters Esther and Jane Nyirenda hold one of their goats. Photo: Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.
Sisters Esther and Jane Nyirenda hold one of their goats. Photo: Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.

Donal Skehan programme visit

In November 2016, celebrity chef Donal Skehan traveled to Malawi to visit our programmes and see the work that we're doing to address malnutrition and hunger across the country. In addition, he saw how our Concern Christmas Gifts are helping to change lives too. 

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Part 2

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How we're helping Malawi

We are working hard to combat suffering and build resilience in Malawi. We are doing this by establishing programmes which will combat gender inequality, climate change and help improve livelihoods.

OpenGraduation programme
OpenClimate change
OpenGender equality

Turkana Climate Crisis Appeal

  • Severe droughts are becoming more frequent

  • Families do not have enough food to eat

  • Malnutrition rates among children under five can reach as high as 30%

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