Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone

Why Sierra Leone? Protracted civil war from 1991 to 2002 caused devastation in Sierra Leone. In 2017, it ranked 184 out of 189 countries in the Human Development Index. We have been working in Sierra Leone since 1996 and are currently working in Port Loko, Tonkolili District and in the Freetown/Western Area. Our integrated programming approach aims to tackle all dimensions of poverty, focusing on the overlapping areas of health, education and livelihoods while maintaining our response to emergencies.

Sierra Leone is facing significant environmental challenges

From 2014 to 2016, a severe Ebola outbreak rocked the country, infecting and killing thousands of people.

After the Ebola outbreak, resumption of iron ore mining led to a rebound of the economy. However, the outlook for 2019 and beyond remains challenging.

The government is working on a new Poverty Reduction Strategy, which will outline its priorities for social and economic development. Unfortunately, there have not been significant changes in addressing the environmental challenges faced by the country, which are directly linked to a number of potential emergencies, like the mudslide seen in 2017.

Concern's Sheena McCann at Freetom cemetery in Sierra Leone. Photo: Kieran McConville
"Alongside preventing the spread of Ebola, what we really wanted to do was to make sure that families could say goodbye to their loved ones with dignity and to know exactly where they were buried. Previously many bodies had been buried in unmarked mass plots."
Sheena McCann, Former Assistant Country Director

Latest achievements

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Malaria prevention

A total of 5,752 people directly benefited from our TAP (treat and prevent) Malaria programme, which improved health service treatment of malaria and other diseases.

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Emergency response

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Adolescent sexual and reproductive health

Patrick Bassie (28), Waterloo Cemetery, Freetown, Sierra Leone. Patrick is a former Concern burial team worker. Patrick is now putting the skills and knowledge he acquired to good use, as a member of the recently formed environmental public health organisation, Protect Sierra Leone. It was set up by former burial workers along with Concern’s support to help improve the health of communities, with specialist teams disinfecting and decontaminating public areas. Photo: Jonathan Porter, Press Eye.
Former Concern burial team member Patrick at Waterloo Cemetery. Photo: Jonathan Porter, Press Eye.
Adamsay and Fatmata picking 'Makrun' - orange wild fruits in the local forest. She is part of the Tawopaneh (let's hold ourselves together) Women's Group. Photo: Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.
Adamsay and Fatmata picking 'Makrun' in the local forest. Photo: Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.
Member of Concern's ebola burial team. Photo: Kristin Myers / Concern Worldwide.
Member of Concern's ebola burial team. Photo: Kristin Myers / Concern Worldwide.
Kadiatu Conteh (35) picking amaranth leaves in the community vegetable garden. She is part of the Tawopaneh (let's hold ourselves together) Women's Group.   The LAAN or Linking Agriculture, Natural Resource Management and Nutrition programme is run by Concern Worldwide and Welthungerhilfe   Photo: Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.
Kadiatu Conteh picks amaranth leaves in the community vegetable garden. Photo: Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.
A ceremony to mark the transition of the Essential Newborn Care Corps, which was established in the Bo district of Sierra Leone by Concern Worldwide under the Innovations for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health initiative. The ENCC will now come under the wing of the health service. Photo: Kieran McConville / Concern Worldwide.
A ceremony to mark the transition of the Essential Newborn Care Corps. Photo: Kieran McConville / Concern Worldwide.

How we’re helping in Sierra Leone

We are working hard to combat suffering and build resilience in Sierra Leone. Our programmes focus on humanitarian response, livelihoods, health, education and gender equality.

OpenSafe learning model
OpenSaving lives
OpenEbola response (2014–2016)

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