Female voices from Niger: 'People asked why I chose a man's job'

Rakia Adamou works as a security guard for Concern in Niger. Photo: Concern Worldwide.
Rakia Adamou works as a security guard for Concern in Niger. Photo: Concern Worldwide.
News9 July 2018Rakia Adamou

Rakia Adamou started working as a security guard with Concern almost two years ago. In the fourth blog from our Female Voices from Niger series, she tells us what makes her a fighter.

A man's job?

I am proud of what I do. I want to be an example to other women. I live without the support of my parents. I get on with things myself to succeed, like all the great women I see and am surrounded by.

When I started the security work, I even had people in my family say: “Why did you choose a man’s job?”

I always reply with: "well, every job is a job."

My job allows me to live, to eat and to provide for my siblings. I want to be a good example for them, since they are still children. I want them to see me working so that they too will rise up and work one day."

Rakia Adamou - Niger

I have people who I inspire and people who inspire me. The people that I admire are those who fight. I like someone who fights, someone who gives 100 percent to everything, because that’s what I do.

Rise up

The advice I have for women who are at home is to look for work, to rise up. We are all human beings.

If you are a woman and you never push yourself then you will never grow. Life is an adventure. You have to rise up and get involved to succeed.

To the men who prevent us from working, who allow us to be exploited, I ask you to allow us to rise up."

Rakia Adamou - Niger

 If we women are considered and counted, it benefits men too. 

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