Kerry Group commits €1 million for Concern food programme in West Africa

Kerry Group commits €1 million for Concern food programme in West Africa

16 October 2018

Global food company Kerry Group has extended its partnership with Concern Worldwide through a four-year project to improve food security and nutrition in Niger.

Details of the innovative programme, which is supported by Kerry Group and implemented by leading international NGO Concern Worldwide, have been announced today as they mark World Food Day.

The Realigning Agriculture to Improve Nutrition (RAIN) programme will make lasting improvements to food security, nutrition and the overall livelihoods in the Tahoua Region of Niger, West Africa.

Left to right - Kerry Group Chief Executive, Edmond Scanlon and Concern Worldwide International Programme Director, Anne O’Mahony announce four-year project to  improve food security and nutrition in Niger.

This second phase of the RAIN programme will be implemented over a fpur-year period and builds on the success of the previous Kerry-funded RAIN project in Zambia.

The RAIN programme uses a multi-disciplinary approach to tackling hunger and malnutrition in some of the world’s poorest regions, with a core objective of increasing food production and encouraging a more diverse, nutrient-rich diet.

The programme also works to promote key health practices for improved maternal and child nutrition, improve access to reliable and safe water sources and reduce inequalities experienced by the extreme poor and vulnerable, particularly women and girls.

By addressing these broader factors contributing to hunger and malnutrition, the objective of this second phase of the RAIN programme is to make a positive, long-term impact on the lives of some of the world’s poorest people.

Positive impact

Speaking at the launch, Kerry Group Chief Executive, Edmond Scanlon, said this extension of the RAIN programme is in keeping with the Group’s ambition to support better nutrition for all.

"As the world’s leading Taste and Nutrition company, we recognise the positive impact Kerry can have on the millions of people who consume our products every day," he said.

"However, many of the world’s poorest people are beyond our direct reach. The RAIN programme offers practical support to some of those most affected by hunger and malnutrition. This World Food Day, we are extremely proud to announce this second phase of the project, demonstrating Kerry’s further commitment to help make Zero Hunger a reality.”

Left to right - Kerry Group Chief Executive, Edmond Scanlon and Concern Worldwide International Programme Director, Anne O’Mahony announce four-year project to  improve food security and nutrition in Niger.

Meaningful change

Concern Worldwide International Programmes Director, Anne O’Mahony, said: “With Kerry Group’s support, Concern has the opportunity to build on the learnings from RAIN in Zambia by extending development programming to a new country, with a continuing focus on integrating sustainable agricultural and nutritional practices.

"Our partnership with Kerry Group is an opportunity to secure lasting and meaningful change in some of the world’s poorest communities.”

ENDS

For more information, contact Catherine Keogh VP, Corporate Affairs & Communications at +353 66 7182304 or at [email protected].

Notes to Editor:

Kerry Group
Kerry Group provide the largest, most innovative portfolio of Taste & Nutrition technologies and systems and
Functional Ingredients & Actives for the global food, beverage and pharmaceutical industries. Our consumer
foods division, Kerry Foods, is also a leading consumer foods processor and supplier in selected EU markets.

Kerry’s industry leading technologies are backed by the industry’s most robust in-house processing
capabilities and expertise to address manufacturing challenges and help customers design winning consumer
products.

Quoted on the London & Irish Stock exchanges, with headquarters in Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland, the Group
reported annual revenue of €6.4billion in 2017.

Niger
Niger, in West Africa, is a landlocked and largely arid state on the edge of the Sahara desert. It is rated by the
UN as one of the world's least-developed nations and is among the worst performing countries in the 2018
Global Hunger Index.

The Tahoua region is one of the two poorest regions in Niger. It is a largely rural and arid region of
predominately small-scale farmers, who are dependent on rain-fed subsistence agriculture.

The poorest families in Tahoua exist in a state of chronic poverty as a result of erratic rainfall, pest invasion,
advancing desertification and inadequate responses to climate change. Because of limited alternatives
available to many families, negative coping mechanisms are common, such as distress migration and the sale
of crucial assets.