Yien poses wth his friends outside his home in Juba PoC. Photo: Steve De Neef / Concern Worldwide.Yien poses wth his friends outside his home in Juba PoC. Photo: Steve De Neef / Concern Worldwide.Yien poses wth his friends outside his home in Juba PoC. Photo: Steve De Neef / Concern Worldwide.

South Sudan

South Sudan

Why are we in South Sudan? South Sudan gained independence in July 2011 and has experienced a long history of conflict, displacement, and deepening humanitarian needs. The Human Development Index (HDI) places it at 186 out of 189 countries. We are responding by providing emergency, resilience, and long-term development programming.

*We are currently responding to the threat of COVID-19 in South Sudan. Find out more about our response here.

Widespread displacement puts untold pressure on people’s ability to cope

In February 2020, the establishment of the Transitional Government of National Unity (TGoNU) marked a step forward in South Sudan’s peace process, which has seen a largely successful ceasefire and a reduction in conflict since 2018. However, the impacts of years of fighting has destroyed livelihoods, and persistent localised insecurity has left 7.5 million people in need of humanitarian assistance. There are 1.5 million people internally displaced within South Sudan and 5.29 million people (45% of the total population) are already facing crisis levels of food insecurity.

Irish artist Brian Maguire pictured alongside paintings which were inspired following his recent visit to a Protection of Civilian Camp in Bentiu, South Sudan with Concern. Photo: Concern Worldwide.
“It’s hard to cope with what you’re seeing because people have nothing. It was two days wandering around the camp before I saw a child with a piece of paper. There are no toys. Nothing.”
Brian Maguire - Irish artist

Latest achievements

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Programme impact

Concern reached over 495,000 of some of the poorest and most vulnerable people in South Sudan through health and nutrition, livelihoods, WASH, food security and shelter programmes in 2019.

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Building NGO capacity

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COVID-19 prevention

Jantik, a young boy living in the PoC of Juba, South Sudan smiles at the camera. Photo: Steve De Neef/Concern Worldwide.
Jantik, a young boy living in the PoC of Juba, South Sudan smiles at the camera. Photo: Steve De Neef/Concern Worldwide.
The lead mothers of Concern's nutrition programme in Bentiu's PoC sing and dance.Photo: Steve De Neef/Concern Worldwide.
The lead mothers of Concern's nutrition programme in Bentiu's PoC sing and dance.Photo: Steve De Neef/Concern Worldwide.
A monthly food distribution in Juba PoC. Photo: Steve De Neef/Concern Worldwide.
A monthly food distribution in Juba PoC. Photo: Steve De Neef/Concern Worldwide.
Tapitha Nyasunday and Nhachuodier Liem Tai, participants of Irish artist Brian Maguire's workshop holds up her resulting painting. Photo: Steve De Neef/Concern Worldwide.
Tapitha Nyasunday and Nhachuodier Liem Tai, participants of Irish artist Brian Maguire's workshop holds up her resulting painting. Photo: Steve De Neef/Concern Worldwide.
Tieni Gal (8) with her cousin Malech Jal (16) inside their home in Bentiu's PoC. Photo: Steve De Neef/Concern Worldwide.
Tieni Gal (8) with her cousin Malech Jal (16) inside their home in Bentiu's PoC. Photo: Steve De Neef/Concern Worldwide.
Veronike Meer, a lead mother in Concern's MIYCN programme with Simon, a Concern nutrition worker. Photo: Steve De Neef/Concern Worldwide.
Veronike Meer, a lead mother in Concern's MIYCN programme with Simon, a Concern nutrition worker. Photo: Steve De Neef/Concern Worldwide.

Brian Maguire programme visit

Irish artist Brian Maguire travelled with Concern Worldwide to a Protection of Civilian camp in Bentiu in 2018. The site is home to 120,000 people who have been displaced by war in South Sudan. His ‘HUMANITY Site Unseen’ exhibition is inspired by the people he met there. His works bear witness to a crisis so vast, it's sufferers have been rendered anonymous by scale.

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How we're helping South Sudan

We're working hard to respond to the growing needs in South Sudan through emergency programming which includes activities around health, food security, and water sanitation and hygiene.

OpenHealth and nutrition
OpenFood security and livelihoods
OpenWater, sanitation and hygiene

South Sudanese Refugee Appeal

  • Life-Saving Food Kits needed

  • Over 300,000 South Sudanese refugees in Ethiopia, 66% are children

  • Acute Malnutrition rate at 10.4% among South Sudanese refugee children under the age of 5.

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